Dog Food (Dr Carter)

This is an interesting recipe with some feeding advice for vintage puppers. I used to make dog food when there was concern about contaminated food coming from China. My dog loved it because of course, it was ground beef! My blend was equal parts ground beef, brown rice and shredded carrots. Our doggo would stand right under my feet while I was cooking because he knew it was his food. Then he would pick out all the carrots because he didn’t like them lol.

Dog Food

1 lb ground meet or hamburger

1 pt water

Little salt. Cook until well done then stir in:

2 1/2 cups all bran or shredded wheat

2 1/2 cups ground dog biscuits (Champion, Milk Bone or Gains Meal)

Mix these together before stirring into meat.

Feed night and morning.

Small dog 1 cup twice a day.

Large dogs 3 or 4 cups as to size twice a day.

Medium dogs 2 cups twice a day.

Leave before dog 1/2 hour then take away until next feeding.

Large dogs 1 ounce to each 1 lb body weight.

Medium dogs 1/2 ounce to each 1 lb body weight.

Small dogs 1/3 ounce to each 1 lb body weight.

Catsup?

Here’s an unnamed recipe for what I think might be catsup. Or possible a sauce of some kind. It’s written on the back of scrap paper from a letter or manual that came out of Boeing in Long Beach.  Reuse, recycle, after all! If you know what this is, please share in the comments.

Catsup?

1 can Campbells Tomato Soup

1 can oil

Teaspoon salt

Teaspoon paprica

3 cloves garlic

3 tablespoonfuls chopped onion

3/4 can vinegar

Sugar

Do something with it and then enjoy it in some other fashion.

 

Also randomly in the recipe box was the card with neatly typed anniversary gift information. However, according to Hallmark they are not exactly correct. Hallmark says the first year is paper, second year is cotton, fourth is fruit or flowers…It must be one of those things that evolves over time. Also, the diamond anniversary was revised from 75th to 60th. I wonder if that has to do with people getting married later in life? In my opinion, every anniversary should be a diamond one lol.

 

Brer Rabbit All-Bran Muffins

Here’s another bran muffin recipe, this time using molasses. The brand Brer Rabbit has several types of strengths, including a lighter, darker and blackstrap. Each has differing intensity of flavor. If you don’t have this brand of molasses, you can use another.

Brer Rabbit All-Bran Muffins

1 c Kellogg’s All-Bran

3/4 c milk

1 c sifted flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 c Brer Rabbit Molasses

1 egg

2 tbsps soft shortening

1/2 c raisins

  1. Combine Kellogg’s All-Bran and milk in mixing bowl.
  2. Sift together flour, baking powder, soda and salt into same bowl. Add Beer Rabbit Molasses, egg shortening, and raisins. Stir only until combined.
  3. Fill greased muffin pans 2/3 full, or for pan bread, spread in greased 8×8 inch pan. Bake in preheated moderately hot oven (400º F) 20-25 minutes. (Slightly longer for pan bread)

Makes 12 medium muffins (or 9 squares of bread).

Corn Bread

From the blue and orange box, this recipe isn’t exactly the same as what is on the Albers box today but it’s very similar. I recently ran out and haven’t replaced the box for comparison’s sake, but from the Albers website it seems the main differences are the modern amount of baking powder has been reduced, and the shortening has been replaced by oil.

Corn Bread (Albers Box)

Sift:

1 cup flour (sifted)

1 cup Albers Yellow Corn Meal

1/4 cup sugar

5 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

Mix:

1 cup milk*

2 tablespoons shortening, melted

1 egg, well beaten. Combine wet and dry ingredients quickly, Pour into shallow greased pan.

Bake: 20 minutes in a hot oven (450º F)

*When evaporated milk (Carnation) is used take half the amount of milk specified and dilute with an equal volume of water.

Lunch Box Chocolate Cake

This recipe is a Betty Crocker sheet, the type that came with flour or other items, and usually included a coupon at the bottom (where it says Cut Here). Sometimes the coupons were for silverware, dishes, or other home items. The recipe follows the “new” method for success that was devised somewhere mid 19th century, which has cooks sift all their dry ingredients together, then add the liquid ingredients. You can see the admonition “For Success Do These First” listing of basic baking tasks. Some of these we don’t really have to do in modern baking. Flour is so well processed these days you don’t have to sift it for clumps. Instead you may want to sift for a light and fluffy starting point. We also have the benefit of baking sprays to replace greasing & flouring a pan, although I don’t know if one is superior to the other. And of course, use whatever brand of flour you like. :-)

Lunch Box Chocolate Cake

For Success Do These First:

  1. Have all ingredients room temperature.
  2. Preheat oven to 350º (moderate)
  3. Grease generously and dust with flour one oblong pan 9x13x2-in.
  4. Measure level for accuracy with standard measuring cups and spoons.
  5. Sift Gold Medal “Kitchen-tested” Flour, then spoon lightly into cup and level off. Do not pack.
  6. If you live at an altitude over 3,000 ft, write Betty Crocker, General Mills, Inc. Minneapolis I, Minn for recipe adjustments. Specify recipes wanted.

Just before starting to mix cake, pour 1/2 cup boiling water into 3 sq melted unsweetened chocolate (3 oz). Stir until a paste is formed.

Sift together in a bowl:

1 3/4 cups sifted Gold Medal “Kitchen-tested” Enriched Flour

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 tsp soda

1 tsp salt

Add:

1/3 cup high grade vegetable shortening

3/4 cup milk

1 tsp vanilla

Beat vigorously with spoon for 2 minutes by clock (about 150 strokes per minute). You may rest a moment when beating by hand; just count actual beating time or strokes. Or, mix with electric mixer on slow to medium speed for 2 minutes. Scrape sides and bottom of bowl frequently.

Add 1/3 to 1/2 cup unbeaten eggs (2 medium)

Continue beating 1 more minute, scraping bowl frequently.

Add the warm chocolate paste

Beat 1 more minute. Pour batter into prepared pan.

Bake 30 to 35 minutes in moderate oven (350º). When cake is cool, frost top with Comfort Icing (recipe below).

Comfort Icing

Mix:

1 cup sugar

1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp white corn syrup

1/4 cup water

Boil slowly without stirring until mixture spins a 6 to 8″ thread or 238º to 242º. (Keep pan covered first 3 minutes).

Beat meanwhile until stiff enough to hold a point 1 egg white

Pour hot syrup very slowly into stiffly beaten egg white beating constantly with rotary beater until mixture is too stiff to beat.

Add 1/2 tsp vanilla

Continue beating with a spoon until mixture is very fluffy and will hold its shape. (If icing does not set so that it will stay on a cake add 2 to 3 tbsp confectioners sugar – a tbsp at a time, until mixture is stiff enough.)

Makes icing for 9x13x2 in cake.

Lemon Cream Cake (Mrs Marin)

Here is an example of a cake that is actually a pie. The delineation of cakes and pies really solidified in the 19th century, as prior to that cake, pie and pudding were all somewhat interchangeable. Remember the Boston Cream Pie that is baked in cake pans, the Fig Pudding that is boiled and resembles a fruitcake, and here we have a cake that is baked in a pie tin.

Lemon Cream Cake

1 c sugar

1 c milk

1 heaping tbs butter

1 heaping tbs flour

2 eggs (separate and beat yolks together, beat whites together)

Juice & rind of 1 large lemon (zest the rind)

Cream butter & sugar. Add flour & beaten egg yolks, rind & juice of lemon. Add milk & lastly beaten egg whites. Stir well. Pour into unbaked crust. Bake in slow oven. To test when done, shake pan. If ingredients do not move, it is done. 1 small pie.

Pineapple Upside Down Cake

I took a quick break for the holidays and I hope you all did too! Today let’s look at one of the quintessential mid century cakes – pineapple upside down cake. There are a few different types of upside down cakes, but the method of putting the fruit topping into the pan first and topping with the remaining ingredients, baking in a skillet, and then turning the cake out right side up is the most common. I’d suspect the resurgence in popularity of cast iron skillets my inspire some home bakers to try some of the vintage style upside down cakes.

Pineapple Upside Down Cake

1/3 cup butter

1 cup granulated sugar

1 egg

1 3/4 cups Pillsbury’s Best Flour

3 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon orange extract

1/2 cup milk

3 tablespoons butter

3/4 cup brown sugar

5 or 6 slices canned pineapple (rings)

Cream the butter and sugar together; add the egg, well beaten, add flavoring. Sift together the dry ingredients; and add to the first mixture alternately with the milk. Cream together the three tablespoons butter and brown sugar. Rub the bottom and sides of heavy frying pan with the mixture; and place the slices of canned pineapple on the bottom and sides of the pan. Pour the cake mixture in; and bake in moderate oven, 375 degrees F., for about forty minutes. Turn onto a round dish; serve hot. The butter and brown sugar mixture furnished sufficient sauce or add whipped cream if desired.