Anise Drops

This is a cookie from Germany. Anise drops are also known as anisplätzchen, meaning anise flavored cookie. Once the batter is made, it is dropped by teaspoonfuls onto a baking sheet and then allowed to rest over night, a minimum of 8 hours and up to 12 hours. The resting time allows the egg white in the batter to rise to the top of the cookie, and when baked it hardens like a merengue. I also found them called self frosting cookies. Some people say the top is like a merengue or French macaron.

I haven’t made them myself, but they sound pretty easy. However, as with several of these recipes from the Girl’s Trade School book, the recipe above is not well organized and might be leaving something out. I looked at some other recipes online and will link them below the transcript.

Anise Drops

6 eggs

1 lb powder sugar

1 lb flour

Beat the sugar & eggs 15 minutes, then put in your flour mixed 1/2 tsp B. P. with the flour. Sometimes you don’t need all the flour, the dough must be stiff not too stiff with the only way to tell is to watch when you drop them all in pans in the evening. Let them stand where they dry & get cool, and bake in the morning in a cool oven & take 1/2 tsp of anise seeds and pound them to a powder, put that in before the flour.

My take on this: Beat the sugar & eggs 15 minutes. Add 1/2 tsp of anise seeds that have been ground. Combine the flour and baking powder together, then add to the egg mixture. Drop by teaspoons to a baking sheet. Let them stand over night to dry, then bake in a cool oven (200 degrees is technically a “cool” oven). Start at 15 minutes then check them so the bottoms are lightly golden.

 

Reference Recipes from Elsewhere

Anise Drops via King Arthur Flour

Anise Plätzchen via Gin’s Kitchen

Vanilla Anise Drop Cookies via The Kitchen Maus

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