Butter Horns (Cold Set)

In the world of butter horn recipes, there is a lot of variation. Some doughs use sour cream, cottage cheese, or just butter. Some have fillings, some don’t. Some chill overnight and bake immediately afterwards, others chill, raise and then bake. I could not find a lot of information on the history of butter horns, although one site claims they originated in Austria in the 18th century as a way to celebrate the removal of the Ottoman Turks from the area. The crescent shaped sweet was a way to “eat their enemies.” Butter horns may be of Jewish origin, or maybe German, Hungarian, Austrian…many places lay claim to this treat.

This particular recipe is a “cold set” meaning the dough will rest overnight, then be allowed to raise again before baking. Modern recipes would likely have you rest it in the refrigerator overnight. Also, most recipes I have seen have you roll out the dough like a pizza or pie crust, then slice it into wedges. It isn’t completely clear if that is what the recipe wants or if this lady had some other method.

Butter Horns (cold set)

4 cups flour

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 pound butter (or half lard and butter)

1 1/2 cups milk

2 eggs

2 cents yeast (probably 2 teaspoons)

Put all dry ingredients together. Add butter, mix like pie crust. Beat eggs. Then put eggs, milk, and yeast in (the yeast having been standing in a little milk and sugar). Whip for 13 minutes. Let stand over night. Take a small amount of dough and roll very thin. Cut into a triangle, spread with butter (melted) and roll up, wide end first. Put on tin. Let raise for 2 or 3 hours. Bake in moderate oven (350) 10 to 15 minutes. Spread with butter frosting.

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