Cocoanut Drop Cookies

It’s interesting that this recipe calls for powdered sugar rather than granulated sugar. My daughter once used powdered sugar instead of granulated sugar in a recipe and the results were not as sweet as expected, due to the fact that they aren’t equivalent and so don’t sweeten with the same amounts. I looked more into … Continue reading

Anise Drops

This is a cookie from Germany. Anise drops are also known as anisplätzchen, meaning anise flavored cookie. Once the batter is made, it is dropped by teaspoonfuls onto a baking sheet and then allowed to rest over night, a minimum of 8 hours and up to 12 hours. The resting time allows the egg white in … Continue reading

Peanut Squares

Smashed in between two other recipes on the page, I originally thought this was part of one of the others. But no, this is a recipe for Peanut Squares that includes powdered sugar and lemon flower. I’m not sure how that would taste, honestly. I couldn’t find any kind of lemon flour, so I’m guessing … Continue reading

Butter Horns

This recipe for Butterhorns is a classic yeast cookie. They have a Danish or Swedish origin and look a bit like a crescent roll, but much smaller. If you are not confident about using yeast, I understand. I only this year have started making my pizza dough by hand and allowing it to rise – … Continue reading

Hermits

Here’s another interesting cookie with a fascinating history. I had never heard of Hermits before, but Mr. Google tells me there is a long and storied mystery & history behind them. Hermits may have been popularized in the American Colonial period as a bar cake that would last for a long time. They have the … Continue reading

Ginger Cookies

This page of the Girl’s Trade School book fell apart as I was handling it, much to my dismay. You can see the bottom edge lost a big chunk out of it. The way the recipe starts out is so charming to me. “You take 1 cup…” sounds a lot like a lady I used … Continue reading

Springlers

I have no idea if I am reading this right, but it sure looks like “springlers” to me. What do you think? Also, the quantity is quite large – 3 pounds of flour, a dozen eggs. What could this possible be? UPDATED: My smart, smart readers all agree this is a recipe for Springerles, a … Continue reading